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PHAI publishes issue brief on viral marketing to children

  • Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • March 15 2013

The Public Health Advocacy Institute (PHAI), with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Health Eating Research program, has released a

UK group files complaints about online ads targeting kids

  • Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP
  • -
  • United Kingdom
  • -
  • February 10 2012

A U.K.-based public interest charity has filed 54 separate complaints with the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) contending that the subject companies, including Cadbury and Pringle’s, are promoting food products high in sugars, fat or salt to children online

Online food marketing a “cynical” ploy to target children, claims new report

  • Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP
  • -
  • United Kingdom
  • -
  • January 13 2012

A recent report issued by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and Children’s Food Campaign (CFC) has described online food marketing to children as “pervasive,” with more than 75 percent of Websites targeting children with high fat, sugar and salt (HFSS) products “linked to a corresponding product or brand page on a social networking site” such as Facebook or Twitter

Consumer interests seek FTC investigation of digital youth marketing; Doritos targeted

  • Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • October 21 2011

Several consumer advocacy organizations have filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) based on a report that “identifies, analyzes, and documents a set of digital marketing practices that pose particular threats to children and youth, especially when used to promote foods that are high in fat, sugars, and salt, which are known to contribute to child and adolescent obesity.”

Critique of study linking obesity to social networks buried in statistical journal

  • Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • June 24 2011

In 2007, a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine generated widespread media coverage for its claims that obesity can be transmitted via social networks, such as friendship, familial relationship or marriage