Rev. Proc. 2016-49

The recent issuance of Rev. Proc. 2016-49, which modifies and supersedes Rev. Proc. 2001-38, now puts the taxpayer in the driver’s seat. Recall that in Rev. Proc. 2001-38, the Service was providing relief for the surviving spouse when an unnecessary QTIP election was made, by treating such a QTIP election as though it had not been made. Practitioners began to question whether Rev. Proc. 2001-38 would render a QTIP election a nullity when made in order to qualify for a state marital deduction where such an election was not needed to reduce the Federal estate tax liability to zero. Then when portability came into the picture, the enhanced concern about basis adjustment at death drove practitioners to want to make a QTIP election even though not needed to reduce the estate tax liability, to permit the surviving spouse to make larger gifts that would not be subject to gift tax or solely to obtain a basis adjustment at death. Yet in view of Rev. Proc. 2001-38, it was not clear whether a QTIP election that did not result in a reduction in estate tax was viable.

Now the Service has solved this dilemma with Rev. Proc. 2016-49. A QTIP election will only be void if ALL of the following are satisfied:

  1. The estate did not exceed the applicable exclusion amount in any event so that a QTIP election would not reduce the estate tax liability.
  2. No portability election was effectively made, either because not actually made or because of a late filed return.
  3. The taxpayer notifies the IRS on a supplemental return that such a QTIP election previously made should be treated as void.
  4. The taxpayer provides sufficient evidence, which could consist of the return on which the
    unnecessary QTIP election was made, that the QTIP election was not needed to reduce the estate tax liability to zero based on the values as finally determined for estate tax purposes.

A QTIP election will not be treated as void where ANY of the following are true:

  1. A partial QTIP election was required to eliminate estate tax and the executor made a
    larger QTIP election than was necessary to reduce the estate tax liability to zero.
  2. The QTIP election was stated as a formula designed to reduce the estate tax liability to zero.
  3. The executor made a protection QTIP election.
  4. The executory made a portability election.

The taxpayer did not request that the QTIP election be treated as void and follow the procedure for having the election treated as void.