On Monday this week the UK Information Commissioner’s Office released its first guidance on the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR): the 12 steps that businesses can start taking now to prepare for the GDPR.  The guide was launched as part of the ICO’s annual Data Protection Practitioners’ Conference, in Manchester.  The ICO also launched a new microsite on the GDPR (see below).

In its accompanying press release, the ICO emphasised that its role is “not just about enforcement and fines” and that the guide would help the ICO to do its work in “guiding organisations who want to make sure they’re following the new rules, and getting it right from the start”. This tallies with the message of the ICO at the conference – it is here to help organisations, but that there are steps that can be taken now to start preparing for the implementation of the GDPR.

Here is a summary::

  • Ensure there is awareness amongst key stakeholders in the organisation that the GDPR represents a major overhaul of data protection law in Europe and ensure they identify the areas of the GDPR that have the biggest impact on them.
  • document the personal data that they hold, where it came from and with whom they share it. The ICO suggests that this can be done through an information audit – this will be necessary to match the updated subject rights for the “networked world”.
  • review current privacy notices and put a plan in place for making any necessary changes in time for GDPR implementation.
  • check existing procedures to ensure that they cover all the rights data subjects now have under the GDPR – both the enhanced rights and the additional right of data portability.
  • look at the various types of data processing they carry out, identify a legal basis under the GDPR for carrying it out and document it.
  • ensure process and procedures are documented – to help demonstrate compliance with the accountability requirements. This may also help a controller to rely on the “manifestly unfounded or excessive” exemption for subject access requests, help to readily produce the upgraded form of privacy notice or help to determine the lead supervisory authority.

Interestingly, many of these recommendations will already be in place for those with BCRs or who have done data audits following the recent Safe Harbor and Privacy Shield developments.  Clearly, now is the time to get your ‘data privacy’ house in order.

We think that the 12 step guide is a useful starting point for all businesses, especially those small-to medium-sized enterprises who may be intimidated by the (over 200-page) GDPR – it helps puts theory into practice and could hint at the ICO’s enforcement focus going forward.

We expect that it will be the first in a set of practical guidance issued by the ICO ahead of the GDPR. Indeed, the ICO has anticipated, in its accompanying blog entry, that over the next few months, it will “…be doing more work to consider the feedback we’ve received and produce a more detailed plan for the guidance, other tools and services we need to develop”. In this way, the ICO seems to be taking a phased and business-friendly approach to the GDPR.

The ICO has also launched a new microsite dpreform.org.uk – this will be the home for the ICO’s GDPR guidance; a key addition to your “favourites” bar.

It has also invited further feedback about the areas in which advice and guidance is most needed – so get in touch if you have any strong views. Watch this space as we see what else the ICO (and other European regulators) will produce on the GDPR