• The idea that the Westminster parties should cooperate on Brexit negotiations is gaining support from the public, businesses and senior politicians from across the political spectrum. With less than a week before formal negotiations with the EU are due to get under way, politicians including John Major, William Hague, Yvette Cooper, Harriet Harman and Nicola Sturgeon are openly calling for all parties to be involved in the talks. They are hoping that a consensual approach will secure a softer version of Brexit than the one threatened by Theresa May in January, when she ruled out membership of the single market and the customs union. A post-election poll by YouGov found that 51% would prefer Brexit to be negotiated by a cross-party team. (Guardian)
  • Labour and Conservative MPs have reportedly met for secret talks amid growing pressure on Prime Minister Theresa May to take a cross-party approach to Brexit in light of the hung Parliament following the general election. Ms May, who is working to form a minority government with support from the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), is being urged by many Labour MPs and some members of her own Cabinet to pursue a so-called soft Brexit, where concessions could be made for access to the single market. (Independent)
  • David Davis has been stripped of his most hardline Brexit minister in the latest sign that Theresa May is planning to soften the terms of Britain’s exit from the European Union. David Jones, a minister of state in the Department for Exiting the EU, was sacked as by Mrs May, who failed to tell the Brexit minister about her plans. He was replaced by Baroness Anelay, who is thought to have supported the Remain campaign before last year’s EU referendum. That came another of his ministers Lord Bridges resigned at the weekend amid claims that he could not work with Downing Street. The peer was replaced by Steve Baker MP, a key player in the Vote Leave campaign and prominent Eurosceptic MP. The changes mean that the Government’s Brexit department has lost two of its four ministers just days before talks are due to start on Monday. (Telegraph)
  • The European Union wants clarity from London as soon as possible on whether it intends to stick to its stance towards Brexit negotiations or alter it following last week’s election, said Guy Verhofstadt, the European Parliament’s point person for Brexit. (Reuters)