Maria del Carmen Ramos, partner in Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick’s Tampa office, recently commented to Law360 on the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Kerry v. Din.  Maria observed that the decision is sure to disappoint most immigration practitioners:

To some observers, the facts of Kerry v. Din — the wife (a naturalized citizen) of a former member of the Taliban regime is precluded from challenging the denial of her husband’s visa on terrorism grounds — may make today’s outcome more palatable. Unfortunately, however, nothing in today’s decision limits it to the facts of this case. Its reach appears much broader than that. The decision surely is a disappointment to immigration practitioners — at least ones who routinely confront mistakes by well-intentioned consular officers — hoping for the end to (or some limit on) the doctrine of consular nonreviewability.

Maria devotes a substantial portion of her practice to counseling clients on immigration and related employment issues. In particular, Maria has extensive experience helping employers obtain H-1B and E visas, as well employment-based green cards, on behalf of foreign workers employed in specialty occupations. She also helps companies that have global operations obtain L-1 visas on behalf of their foreign-based employees so they can transfer to the United States. In addition to helping employers obtain visas for foreign workers, Maria routinely conducts audits for clients to ensure they are complying with their obligation to verify their employees’ eligibility to work in the United States.