Continuing a trend of recent attention to significant False Claims Act issues that have divided the courts of appeals, the Supreme Court this morning invited the views of the Solicitor General in a case that implicates two such issues—(1) dismissal for violation of the seal requirement and (2) the so-called collective knowledge theory of scienter.  The specific Questions Presented in the cert petition are:

  1. What standard governs the decision whether to dismiss a relator’s claim for violation of the FCA’s seal requirement, 31 U.S.C. § 3730(b)(2)?
  2. Whether and under what standard a corporation or other organization may be deemed to have “knowingly” presented a false claim, or used or made a false record, in violation of section 3729(a) of the FCA based on the purported collective knowledge or imputed ill intent of employees other than the employee who made the decision to present the claim or record found to be false, where (i) the employee submitting the claim or record independently made the decision to present the claim or record in good faith after reviewing the available information and (ii) there was no causal nexus between the submission of the false claim or record and the purported collective knowledge or imputed ill intent of those other employees?

The petition is here, and amicus briefs filed in support of cert can be accessed here, here, and here.

The Solicitor General will likely file a brief in time for the Court to reconsider the petition before the summer recess at the end of June, and the invitation itself means that the Court is already taking a hard look at the petition.  This is another case to watch closely.