Regular readers of this blog know that Florida law allows “valid restraints of trade,” under certain circumstances. Those restrictions apply to the employer-employee relationship when written and duly executed in accordance with Florida statutes. These restraints of trade are commonly called “Non-Compete” or “Non- Competition” agreements. There are similar restrictions that can prohibit a departing employee from using a former employer’s trade secrets.

Florida’s valid restraints of trade do not apply to attorneys. As a result, attorneys are not subject to non-compete agreements. Go figure.

Physicians, on the other hand, are often required to enter into non-compete agreements as conditions of employment. Recently a group of Florida physicians asked me whether Florida law recognizes a public policy argument that negates all non-compete agreements attempting to restrain doctors from practicing in the location of their choosing or seeing previous patients. The simple answer is “No,” however the analysis seldom ends there. Generally speaking, there is no statute or case law in Florida that negates the enforcement of an otherwise valid non-compete agreement against a physician or a physician’s practice. (There are cases that have disallowed the agreements, and there are cases in which the physician was found not to have violated the non-compete terms, however there are no cases that courts regularly cite or follow creating a public policy against restricting a physician’s practice after the physician departs from a prior employer.)

So what is a physician to do when she is attempting to relocate her practice or when she hopes to join a competitor? First, and perhaps most obviously, the physician can usually negotiate (read: pay money) to opt out of the non-compete agreement. Many times a physician’s non-compete agreement actually contains the manner and costs associated with the buy-out provision. The second vehicle to challenge a physician’s non-compete agreement is on the grounds of the definition of the reasonable restriction of geographic area. Some patients will travel great distances to see their doctor. The more specialized the physician’s practice, the more likely a court will recognize the need for a greater geographic restriction. (At the same time, the more specialized the physician’s practice, the more likely the physician can argue that an actual public policy concern justifies a court’s decision to allow an argument to render the non-compete void.)

What we have found over the years is that physician practices are not shy about enforcing non-compete agreements with departing physicians. At the same time, nearly all of these physician practice groups are far more interested in resolving these issues through (financial) negotiations than through the continuation of litigation. Either way, the law in this area is very nuanced and fact-specific. As with all non-compete cases, Florida courts are obligated to construe the written, executed agreements according to their plain terms, interpreting all ambiguities in favor of unrestricted employment.

Quarterbacks are entirely different. The typical non-compete comes in the form of untimely interceptions. As a life-long NY Giants fan it’s important to recognize that losing the first two regular-season games when holding a double-digit lead in the fourth quarter is simply non-competitive. This despite Eli Manning’s contract extension that included a guarantee of more than $60 million. Fortunately, the Giants held their fourth quarter lead in the third game. That’s more competitive. Note to Eli: please stay healthy. And Eli, if you suffer an injury, consider receiving your treatment down in Florida. We have some seriously great physicians here. They’re very competitive.