The U.S. Chamber of Commerce recently weighed in with an amicus brief in an interesting class action appeal in the Ninth Circuit.  See Brazil v. Dole Packaged Foods LLC, No. 14-17480 (9th Cir., brief filed 6/3/15).  The issue in the case, which we posted on before, centered on whether a proposed class plaintiff had shown a reliable model for establishing class-wide damages.  

Readers will recall that under Comcast Corp. v. Behrend, 133 S. Ct. 1426 (2013), a class action should not be certified under Fed. R. Civ. P. 23(b) unless the proposed plaintiffs can present a damages model that isolates the harm attributable to the alleged misconduct.   We have posted about this important requirement before.

In this case, plaintiff pleaded two relevant class claims alleging misrepresentation: a claim under California Business and Professions Code section 17200 (the Unfair Competition Law, hereinafter “UCL”) and one claim under the common law for unjust enrichment. He contended the proposed class should be entitled to restitution for the UCL claim and to disgorgement of defendant's profits under the unjust enrichment claim.

The district court rejected both claims, granting summary judgment, correctly (per the brief) determining that plaintiff failed to meet the Comcast requirement for his UCL claim because his “damages model” did not isolate the price premium he alleged the class paid (what the class might be entitled to as restitution) as the result of the alleged mislabeling (the theory of liability). Because this damages model failed, the court dismissed the UCL claim for insufficient evidence. The district court then further found that the same damages analysis applied to the unjust enrichment claim, making the unjust enrichment claim duplicative of the UCL claim and dooming it on the merits for the same reason. 

The Chamber took issue with plaintiff’s argument on appeal that the unjust enrichment claim provided a different measure of damages; both claims measure the same quantum of damages.  Thus, a mislabeling plaintiff’s claim for unjust enrichment cannot salvage a damages model for restitution that otherwise fails under Comcast.  In any event, the class cannot recover both the price premium it paid as a result of the allegedly misleading label and the profits Dole derived from the allegedly misleading label. That would amount to double recovery which is unavailable by law and would raise serious due process concerns for the businesses targeted in these mislabeling lawsuits. That same price premium can be recovered only once (at most) assuming that there is an appropriate model that passes muster under Comcast.  Although unjust enrichment starts from a different premise, the measure of recovery for unjust enrichment—at least in a food mislabeling case—is necessarily the same as the measure for restitution: the premium (if any) the business charged for the food as a result of the allegedly misleading claim on the label.

Plaintiff appeared to argue in his opening brief that the burden should shift to the defendant to provide a damages model for plaintiff’s unjust enrichment claim. This is contrary to the customary burden of proof for any plaintiff. Indeed, the authority cited by plaintiff all starts with the plaintiff producing evidence permitting at least a reasonable approximation of the amount of the wrongful gain.  Plaintiff simply cannot, argued the amicus, circumvent Comcast by pleading an unjust enrichment claim in an effort to shift to the defendant the burden of coming up with a damages model. And disgorging more profits from businesses than they made as a result of an allegedly misleading statement on a label would raise those serious due process issues.