A story in the New York Times recently portrays the ice cap in Greenland as rapidly disappearing. (NYT). Indeed, the pictures are dramatic. The story is based on experiences and observations from scientists working in the area, and it tends to support similar claims made by researchers in recent years about changing conditions in Greenland. At the same time, those who deny that global warming is occurring, or at least that it is not significantly caused by human activity, have pointed to other reasons for the reduction in the ice cap there. (Junk Science) Thus, observations are made that this may be part of a recurring trend of expansion and contraction of the ice cap or the result of geothermal activity or, perhaps, for some other reason not caused by human activity. And, indeed, there are some legitimate points and for both sides as explained in a recent BBC summary of the global warming issues. (Guide to Climate Change)

Can both positions be embraced, more or less? It seems so, at least to the Governor of Alaska. Recently he was quoted in a BCC interview as noting that climate changes are significantly affecting living conditions for native Alaskans in remote villages, particularly in the arctic region where villages are being threatened by rising sea levels. This means that the State may be obliged to assist those villages including through relocation. How would he pay for this apparent result of global warming? Through additional drilling for oil and natural gas in Alaska. (BBC Interview)

An ironic circle of reasoning? You be the judge.