Since the growth of so-called ‘crash for cash’ scams, UK motorists are fighting back by installing dashboard cameras known as ‘dash-cams'. The popularity of the dash-cam, a small video camera that clips on to a driver’s front windscreen and records the road ahead, is growing. Depending on the model, a dash-cam will also track the date, time, speed and precise location of the car. 

In the event that a motorist needs to use the footage following an accident, the camera can be disconnected and the footage downloaded to a computer. Such dash-cams are becoming increasingly popular in the UK as they can offer a motorist peace of mind, security and make them feel safer on the roads. 

According to research carried out by the RAC in late 2014, 4% of those surveyed in the UK already had dash-cams fitted and a further 39% were considering purchasing one. 

Charlene McAuliffe, associate in the Penningtons Manches personal injury team, comments: “There is some concern that the addition of dash-cams could prove to be just another distraction for a driver. There is already a range of technology inside cars that divert a driver’s attention from the road, such as CD players or satellite navigation systems. As dash-cams are still relatively new to motorists, it is impossible to know whether they have a positive or negative effect on the quality of driving. 

“While we support the use of dash-cams, we also encourage motorists not to be complacent. When used correctly, a dash-cam can provide a valuable record of the circumstances of an accident and be an excellent tool in the fight against motor insurance fraud and bogus claims. All those involved in this industry need to work together to prevent fraudulent individuals from abusing a system put in place to help genuine claimants.”