Expectations are running high among some that the incoming Republican majority in both Houses of Congress will act to change or eliminate various environmental regulations and statutory provisions that they claim harm the economy. Interest groups are extending these efforts to enlist State officials in opposing these regulations at that level and, for his part, President Obama has indicated an intent to use his veto authority in an effort to prevent major changes in regulation and policy.

One of the foremost issues of concern on the part of many Republicans is the proposal to limit carbon pollution from coal-fired power plants. In mid-December, 99 House members sent a letter to the President asking that he direct EPA to withdraw its proposed Clean Power Plan rule. (House letter). Similarly, various conservative groups have contacted State legislators and other elected officials calling on them to resist the Plan in any way possible. (The Hill). The States have substantial authorities for the implementation of air pollution control regulations under the federal Clean Air Act, just as they do with the implementation of other major federal environmental statute.

However, there are some indications that these position may not be quite as unified across the Republican leadership as first thought. For example, a recent interview given by Senator James Inhofe of Oklahoma to the Tulsa World indicates that initial efforts may focus elsewhere. Senator Inhofe, a leading denier of climate change science, will become the Chairman of the Environment and Public Works Committee the Senate’s key environmental committee. Yet, he indicated in the interview that initial focus of his chairmanship of would be on transportation and infrastructure. (Tulsa World). Also of interest, a recent poll conducted jointly by the Associated Press-NOR Center for Public Affairs Research and Yale University indicates that, while 6 in 10 Americans support regulation of carbon dioxide pollution, fully half of persons identifying themselves as Republicans hold the same position. (StarTribune). Even if the Republican majority eventually pushes substantial legislation through both Houses to affect environmental issues, including climate change, President Obama has promised a veto. (ABC Report).

While it seems clear that environmental issues will be at the forefront of Congressional debate in the upcoming Congress, it is not so clear how far this may go, or in exactly what direction. As we have seen before, exercising the powers of leadership often imposes restraints that are not in place when campaigning for leadership positions.