The title of this post is the title of an article in yesterday’s New York Times which discussed a new study from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis which “found that the prospects for women over 50 darkened after the Great Recession. …     [T]he waves from the recession, which ended six and a half years ago, continue to upend many people who were cast aside during and immediately after the storm.”

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Looking as if it could have been lifted from an earlier Times’ article which I discussed in a September 27th postwhich I titled “Older Workers’ Difficulties Getting A Job Their Own Faults?,” the reporter writes:

“A shrinking network of professional contacts, and possibly fewer cutting-edge skills, can also hamper older workers in the job hunt, said Connie Wanberg, a professor at the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. In a world where networking is done more and more online, they may be less adept at the latest techniques. Older workers can also be pickier, Ms. Wanberg said — more reluctant to relocate away from family, for example, or to do certain kinds of jobs.”

Somehow, the earlier Times article cited this professor’s conclusions as evidence of the problem of older people — male and female — getting jobs, but now uses it to account for the problem supposedly facing only older women.  Remarkable how these controversial conclusions can be made so  flexible!

But the Times did note briefly that “Certainly older workers — male and female — must contend with age discrimination.”

Ya think?

Looks like this last conclusion could have been lifted from my many posts.