A home health care provider’s policy of offering free introductory visits to patients who had already selected it as their home health care provider does not generate prohibited remuneration under the federal antikickback statute, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) concluded in a recent advisory opinion. (OIG Advisory Opinion No. 15-12.) The home health agency requesting the advisory opinion (requestor) stated that a physician or a health care professional provides a list of home health providers to a patient who needs home health services. The requestor has no involvement in the patient’s selection process, nor does it offer or pay any remuneration to the physician or other referral source. After a patient chooses the requestor as his or her home health agency, an employee of the requestor (liaison) contacts the patient by telephone to see if he or she would like to have an introductory visit with the liaison. The purpose of the introductory visit is to facilitate the patient’s transition to home health services and to increase compliance with the treatment plan. The liaison does not provide any diagnostic or therapeutic service reimbursed by any federal health care program during the introductory visit and the services provided during the introductory visit do not require clinical training.

The OIG concluded that the introductory visits were not remuneration because they did not provide any actual or expected economic benefit to patients. Although the services may have some “intrinsic value” to patients, the OIG concluded that the “intangible worth to patients” created by the introductory visits do not implicate the federal antikickback statute or the Civil Monetary Penalty law.