Beginning April 1, 2016, a new Nebraska law goes into effect that makes it easier for Nebraska financial institutions to vary ATM fees based on the interchange rates charged by their switches. This ends the moratorium that has been in place since May 2015, when amendments to Nebraska’s ATM law went into effect.

Under the Nebraska Banking Act, ATMs in the state must be available on a “nondiscriminating basis,” meaning that ATM usage fees must be the same for cardholders of all Nebraska-based accounts. In September 2014, four Nebraska banks filed a lawsuit against Metro Health Services FCU, an Omaha-based credit union, alleging discrimination in ATM usage fees in violation of state law. Metro FCU defended the lawsuit by arguing that the different rates charged to customers were not for its own fees but instead were “switch fees” set by the switches that route ATM transactions between financial institutions. In May 2015, the Nebraska legislature amended the law to clarify when financial institutions are permitted to vary ATM fees charged to other Nebraska financial institutions. An important piece of that law that allows financial institutions to implement the new changes takes effect April 1, 2016.

The new law provides that each switch must have a uniform interchange rate that it charges for all Nebraska-based financial institutions for essentially the same service, but each switch may decide its own rate. The financial institution that establishes or sponsors an ATM may contract with multiple switches for routing ATM transactions, and a new provision provides that it is not considered a discriminatory practice for the financial institution to charge different ATM usage fees based on which switch handles the transaction, if the switches’ fees differ from one another.

In addition, the law now excludes surcharge-free networks among affiliate institutions from the anti-discrimination requirements, so a financial institution may charge one rate for surcharge transactions and a different rate for surcharge-free transactions (even if routed over the same switch). If an ATM offers different transaction services from other ATMs, then differences in usages fees would also not constitute unlawful discrimination.

The law set a moratorium on changes to ATM usage fees and new agreements until April 1, 2016, with existing contracts still subject to the old law. Beginning on April 1, 2016, ATM-sponsoring financial institutions and switches can once again sign new customers and modify existing contracts. All new (or newly amended) contracts made after this date must be in compliance with the new law. While existing contracts are temporarily grandfathered in under the old law, beginning November 1, 2016, all ATM usage must comply with the new provisions, so even existing contracts will need to be modified if they do not currently comply.

This law does not affect fees charged to customers of financial institutions outside of Nebraska, or fees charged by financial institutions outside of Nebraska.

The new law makes it easier for Nebraska financial institutions to vary ATM fees based on the interchange rates charged by their switches. Now that financial institutions and switches can resume contracting for ATM services, it is important to ensure that new contracts comply with the law’s new provisions.