‘Tis the season for your company’s annual holiday party. And while the notion of drinking, eating and generally enjoying merriment with your coworkers, subordinates, and superiors may seem innocuous, it is anything but. What seems like a festive occasion during the most wonderful time of the year is, if sledded incorrectly, a mine field of potential employment law mishaps. And while I don’t mean to be a Scrooge, this week’s lesson comes from a scene in one of my favorite holiday classics, the movie Scrooged with Bill Murray. What can we learn from this seasonal, cinematic favorite? Well, you can learn that, for purposes of the company holiday party, you should consider “Scrooge-ing” yourself.

In the movie, Bill Murray’s character, Frank Cross (the modern day Scrooge), is visited by three ghosts, several of whom transport him back in time to certain life events that froze his heart and led to his hatred for Christmas. During one of his time-traveling trips, Frank visits his office during a wild late-1960s holiday party. People are seen drinking heavily, dancing, flirting with coworkers, and dressing inappropriately, and one woman, Tina (who is wearing a rather skimpy Santa’s helper outfit) is even handing out photocopies of her derriere. As the coworkers are partying with reckless impunity, Frank passes through the party while completing his work tasks. Frank is wearing his work attire and is not drinking. The boss asks Frank to note the ongoing party and implies that he should join. Frank politely declines and advises his boss that he has several projects that he needs to complete. Tina then approaches Frank, hands him a copy of her “resume,” and appears particularly enthused to see Frank. Frank essentially brushes her off and goes about his work. The merry office party, like the little drummer boy, marches on.

So what lessons can we learn from this scene? For purposes of the company holiday party, go Scrooge yourself, at least a little bit. Here are my top five tips for conducting yourself appropriately at the company holiday party, regardless of whether you are the CEO or the most recently hired file clerk.

  1. Dress appropriately. A company holiday party is still a work event. It’s not a Vegas nightclub. Stay away from clothes that will draw a lot of attention to you and provide fodder for your coworkers. If you look in the mirror and question whether your outfit is inappropriate, it probably is. Go change and put on something more appropriate.
  2. Don’t flirt with coworkers (again, it’s not a Vegas nightclub) or engage in other inappropriate conversations such as office gossip, politics, religion, etc. If this effectively eliminates 95 percent of your conversation, you should consider skipping the holiday party and reading some books and newspapers to broaden your conversation base.
  3. Don’t drink excessively (see Vegas nightclub reference here). Know your tolerance and drink in a manner that will permit you to maintain your professionalism. You don’t have to go full Frank Cross, but drink in moderation. If you drink, consider calling Uber or taking a cab home.
  4. Don’t stay until the wee hours of the night (save that for the Vegas nightclub). If history and college tell us anything, it’s that very bad things can happen late at night, especially when people drink. Plan to leave before the scheduled end of the party and stick to that plan. If you feel yourself getting drunk, regardless of the time, arrange for an Uber or a cab and go home immediately.
  5. Don’t assume everyone celebrates a particular holiday (no applicable Vegas nightclub reference). Many holidays are celebrated during December including Kwanzaa, Hanukkah, Christmas, Festivus (see my July 27, 2015 blog referencing Seinfeld), etc. Be sensitive to the fact that we’re a diverse country with diverse holidays and rituals.

Moral of the story: When it comes to the holiday office party, Scrooge yourself a little bit. In other words, do the exact opposite of what you would do in a Vegas nightclub. Happy holidays!