As most of Toronto and their beloved Blue Jays fans across the hemisphere are in lockdown mode on October 14, 2015 in anticipation of the decisive Game 5 of baseball's American League Division Series, monumental events are happening all around the globe today.

First, the esteemed gentleman's bible, Playboy, has gone public with its decision to no longer publish photos of nude women. Marilyn Monroe must be turning over in her grave. Pipe and slipper sales clearly will soon be dropping through the floor and a trade war will no doubt ensue over magazine subsidies or content. In all seriousness, when we see a change like this announced, it really does look like a bellweather. Our world and how we consume information is changing so fast, it truly is difficult to keep track. The implications which this accelerated pace of change has for our workplaces, our homes, and our lives is astounding. And the implications which this has in legal systems around the world is hard to fathom.

Second, a battle has ensued between Australia on the one hand, and musician Morrissey paired with pinup Brigitte Bardot on the other. Their beef? Feral cats. About two million of them, which the government of Australia plans to cull over the next five years. The legendary frontman for The Smiths, who made headlines with hits such as "Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now", has accused the Aussies of "taking idiocy just too far". You can hear the Sydney cricketers now shouting "takes one to know one, mate". Earlier in the year, Bardot wrote an open letter to the Australian environment minister, Greg Hunt, calling the plan "scandalous" and spewing that "animal genocide is inhumane and ridiculous". To the neutral observers, this seems to show a distinct lack of perspective, and ignores the fact that the move is intended to protect other animal species. Australian coach Eddie Jones, who lead Japan to a thrilling upset of South Africa at this year's Rugby World Cup (Note: apologies to Springboks fans) commented when interviewed about his team's fate in the tournament: "I'm too old for this. I should be watching cricket in Barbados". No word yet on whether or not Morissey and Ms. Bardot might take up watching baseball. Torontonians are pleased to report that the Rogers Centre, which is home of the Blue Jays, is now likely to be sold out for years to come.

Lastly, Canadian media reported today that senior business correspondent Amanda Lang will be leaving the CBC. This came as a shock to some, since earlier reports had suggested that Ms. Lang was potentially in line for the Corporation's top evening newscaster role. Lang, who has a pedigreed past and became well known for her confrontational appearances with Dragon's Den softie Kevin O'Leary, which often became predictable rants about why failure should at times be rewarded. Lang (and others) were the subject of intense scrutiny this past year over paid speaking engagements, which at the very least gave to some the appearance of bias. The CBC's announcement of this change refers to Lang leaving for a position that is "a new opportunity outside the CBC in television". Some of the "sandals and socks" crowd who enjoy their baseball the old-fashioned way (i.e. on the radio) may well be cheering. This moves highlights a number of trends, including the increasing mobility of the very successful. Lang was, in the eyes of many, "set for life" at the CBC. Her ambition, however, was such that she saw broader horizons which extend beyond the public sector mindset. This reflects the realities of the modern working world where free agency, mobile workers, and short stints with one organization are becoming the norm. Indeed, journalists, sports stars, and cab drivers could all rightfully say "this job ain't what it used to be".

In summary, carefully tuned in Toronto Blue Jays fans have already witnessed a triple play today. Must run – Go Jays Go!