A recent study conducted by the University of Paris-Saclay identified the presence of carbon nanotubes in children’s lungs in France.  Researchers examined 69 randomly selected lung fluid samples and found evidence of carbon nanotubes in all 69 of the samples.  The samples were collected from the lungs of children between the ages of 2 and 17 years suffering from severe asthma.  Carbon nanotubes are often used in the manufacture of computers, clothing and healthcare technology.  Carbon nanotubes are also found in automobile exhaust.  Although the source of the nanotubes identified in the children’s lung fluid was not identified, the study found that the particulate matter was mostly composed of anthropogenic multi-walled carbon nanotubes ranging from 10 to 60 nanometers in diameter and several hundred nanometers long.  According to the study authors, this study was the first study demonstrating that carbon nanotubes from anthropogenic sources reach human lung cells. However, others have been critical of the study, noting that previous studies have not found evidence of carbon nanotubes accumulating in the lungs.  Please click here to view the study.