In 2013 the British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal found that the University of British Columbia had discriminated against Dr. Carl Kelly when it dismissed him from its Family Medicine Residency Program. Dr. Kelly was awarded damages, including, significantly, $75,000 for injury to dignity, feelings and self-respect. At the time, the high water-mark for this head of damages was $35,000; this had been the result of relatively incremental increases to damages for injury to dignity over time. The award to Dr. Kelly exceeded this threshold by $40,000.

In the case of Dr. Kelly, the Tribunal held that the circumstances were such that a substantial award was appropriate, relying in part on Dr. Kelly’s life-long dream to be a physician and the humiliation and isolation from his family and friends he experienced as a result of his dismissal.

The University sought Judicial Review of the Tribunal’s decision on both the finding of discrimination and the damages awarded. In particular, the University argued that the Tribunal had put undue emphasis on the fact that Dr. Kelly was a medical resident, and that the award of $75,000 created a bifurcated approach to injury to dignity: one for professionals and one for other employees.

On September 24, 2015, the Court did not interfere with the Tribunal’s findings on the merits, but overturned the award of $75,000 on the basis that it was patently unreasonable.

Mr. Justice Silverman found that the award of $75,000 for injury to dignity put undue emphasis on the fact that Dr. Kelly was engaged in medical training and was denied access to his chosen profession. The Court held that in doing so, the Tribunal was elevating damage awards for complainants in professional occupations relative to other categories of employment. Disagreeing with the Tribunal’s finding that Dr. Kelly’s context was inherently unique, the Court held that the Tribunal’s award was patently unreasonable because there was no principled reason why this particular complainant’s circumstances warranted more than doubling the previous highest award.

Importantly, the Court did not comment on what would have been a reasonable award in the circumstances; rather, it remitted the decision back to the Tribunal for reconsideration. It therefore remains open to the Tribunal to grant Dr. Kelly an award for injury to dignity in excess of $35,000, ensuring this case will continue to attract considerable attention.