As we previously reported, the Supreme Court last year declined an invitation to resolve a circuit split regarding how much detail about particularized false claims must be pleaded in an FCA case in order to satisfy Rule 9(b)’s particularity requirement. A new cert petition filed this month asks the Court to take up the issue this term. Last year, in an opinion we wrote about here, the 11th Circuit affirmed in part and overruled in part the dismissal of an FCA complaint under Rule 9(b). The court held that while the relator had not pleaded, and was not required to plead facts regarding specific false claims, he had pleaded other facts that provided sufficient “indicia of reliability” with respect to his claims based on conduct allegedly occurring during his employment by the defendants. By contrast, the court held, the relator had failed to plead sufficient “indicia of reliability” that the conduct continued after his employment ended, and therefore affirmed the dismissal of the post-employment claims. It is the latter ruling with which the cert petition, filed by the relator, takes issue. The question presented in the cert petition is “[w] hether, under Rule 9(b), it is sufficient for a relator under the False Claims Act to plead "particular details of a scheme to submit false claims paired with reliable indicia that lead to a strong inference that claims were actually submitted" to the government, or whether Rule 9(b)'s particularity requirement precludes the drawing of reasonable inferences that claims were actually submitted”

In the petition considered last year, the Supreme Court requested the Solicitor General’s views. The SG’s brief, while recognizing a circuit split, encouraged the Court to deny cert, and the Court did just that. It remains to be seen whether the Solicitor General will, or will be asked to by the Court, weigh in on the petition. In any event, we will continue to monitor this case and report on important developments.