As the year winds down, we thought it wise to look back at what California’s busiest locality has done in developing local employment law. The folks in the Bay Area have been so busy flexing their employment law muscles that we’ve split this summary into two easily digestible posts to provide what you’ll need to hop on the trolley to compliance city.

Voter-approved measures addressed higher wages, more sick leave, and increasingly flexible work schedules for employees in Oakland, San Francisco, and Berkeley. While many have left their hearts in San Francisco, these measures will have some employers wanting to have their business elsewhere. Those measures require employers to provide wages and benefits that far exceed state and federal requirements. These new laws also may indicate what’s to come for the rest of the very active Bay Area.

Minimum Wage

As this blog has previously covered (e.g., here and here), California recently raised its minimum wage to $9 per hour, effective July 1, 2014—with an increase to $10 per hour scheduled for January 1, 2016. But the state was a bit late to this game, as several  cities had already mandated higher wages for local employees. Cities in the Bay Area have been particularly active here: San Jose ($10.15, effective March 2013, with an annual cost of living adjustment (COLA)), Richmond ($9.60, effective January 2015, with incremental increases to $12.30 by 2017, then an annual COLA), and Berkeley ($10.00, with planned incremental increases culminating at $12.53 by October 2016). 

On November 4, 2014, voters approved the following measures in Oakland and San Francisco that will raise wages in those cities to similar and even higher levels.

Oakland: Ballot Measure FF

Despite Gertrude Stein’s famous observation to the contrary, perhaps in Oakland there is some “there there”: On November 4, Oakland voters passed Measure FF, adding provisions to the City’s municipal code regarding a “city minimum wage, sick leave, and other employment standards.” Effective March 2, 2015, Oakland’s minimum wage will increase to $12.25 for any employee who (a) is covered by state and federal minimum wage laws and (b) works at least two hours “[i]n a particular week … within the geographic boundaries of the City for an Employer.” Beginning January 1, 2016, and to celebrate New Year’s Day for every year that follows, the minimum wage will increase in line with a COLA.

The Oakland ordinance also includes a provision specific to employees in hospitality industries that impose “Service Charges” to collect separately for such items as banquets, deliveries, room service, or porterage. Under the new ordinance, Service Charges must be paid directly to the employees performing the relevant services. The section addressing Service Charges specifically exempts “any tip, gratuity, [or] money” given to hospitality workers “by customers over and above the actual amount due for services [or goods] rendered,” perhaps because state law already requires these payments to be provided to the employees.

San Francisco: Proposition J 

Attentive readers of this blog will recall the list of Bay Area cities with recent minimum wage ordinances. San Francisco does not appear on that list, because, as we’ve previously discussed, San Francisco set the standard for a higher minimum wage way back in 2003. That ordinance calls for annual COLA increases and, as of January 1, 2014, had set the floor for wages for San Francisco employees at $10.74.

Unwilling to let the full spotlight shine on the bright side of the Bay, Frisco’s voters, in November, passed Proposition J. This true San Francisco treat for employees has amended the existing ordinance to increase the minimum wage yet again. The local minimum wage now will increase to $11.05 per hour on January 1, 2015. will incrementally increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour by July 1, 2018. and thereafter will annually increase, in accordance with a COLA.1 

While the voters thus decided to ensure the Bay Area remains a pricey place to pay wages, they didn’t stop there. Stay tuned for next week when we walk you through two other areas where Bay Area voters let themselves be heard on behalf of employees: sick time and flexible schedules.