Seyfarth Synopsis: In leaves of absence, as in employment law generally, California can be peculiar. We examine at a few examples, including particular city ordinances in Emeryville and San Francisco, and other statewide oddities such as voting, organ/tissue donation, and reckless student leave.

In the weird, wonderful, and often complex world of California leave laws, there are many familiar species. However, alongside the more commonplace military, disability, and medical leaves, California and its municipalities also recognize a wide array of strange, surprising, and uncommon leave categories:

  • “The Secret Life of Pets,” in Emeryville: Fortunately for employers (although perhaps unfortunately, for those of us who are dog and cat lovers), California has not exactly mandated “paw-ternity” leave just yet… But, we’re clawing our way closer! In June 2015, the city of Emeryville passed a paid sick leave ordinance allowing employees to use paid sick leave to care for a designated individual, if the employee has no spouse or registered domestic partner. Even Fido can be covered since the ordinance allows employees to use paid sick leave to provide care for a guide dog, signal dog, or service dog.
  • “Homeward Bound,” in San Francisco: San Francisco recently passed paid parental leave for most employees. And, San Francisco also has a different ordinance granting expansive paid sick leave, which allows workers to take time off to care for both family members and a “designated person” when they need medical care or attention. The designated person can be anyone the employee chooses, as long as their name is on file with the employer before the employee uses the leave. San Francisco’s paid sick leave ordinance covers almost any type of employee, including undocumented workers and household employees, such as caregivers, cooks, and house cleaners.
  • The “Shaggy” Troublemaker Student: Does your employee have a kid who has been sent to the principal’s office one too many times? According to California Labor Code § 230.7 and California Education Code § 48900.1, that employee is entitled to protected unpaid time off work if their child faces suspension from school. This applies to all employers regardless of the number of employees, as long as the employee provides reasonable notice to the employer.
  • Voting—“An American Tail”: Does your employee need to leave early to partake in the democratic process? California Election Code §14000 provides that an employee without sufficient time outside of his or her normal working hours to vote may take up to two hours off work to vote without loss of pay. The time off should be during the beginning or end of a regular working shift, and the employee is required to provide notice to their employer at least two working days in advance to arrange for voting time.
  • All Donators “Go to Heaven”: If your employee decides to help save a life and donate an organ or bone marrow, the employee is likely to need time off of work. In 2011, as the winner of a state senator’s “There Ought to Be a Law” contest, a new law was passed requiring employers to provide employees the opportunity to take leave to donate their own human tissue. Thus, California Labor Code § 1510 requires private employers with more than 15 employees to provide paid leaves of absence for organ and bone marrow donation.

These are just a few of the unusual protected leaves you may be faced with as an employer in California. And these bizarre rules are a good reminder that when dealing with employees and leaves in California, it may be best to tread cautiously.