A takeover of one business by another can be a lot like a visit from your mother-in-law.

On Mother’s Day, we enjoy a cup of tea or a glass of bubbles with our mums in recognition of all their hard work and sacrifice. We give thanks for the tips, advice, guidance and life-long lessons only they can proffer. I recall with great fondness my Mum’s unwavering enthusiasm during the tears, tantrums and pre-stage jitters of my jazz-ballet/hip/funk/tap performances. For Mum, an exhaustive commitment of pick-ups and drop-offs, elaborate hair do’s, dress rehearsals and toe-tapping her way through yet another Robert Palmer tribute. Every time, through the haze of Cedel Hairspray Extra Firm, there was my Mum.

But what about when your mother-in-law comes to stay? When all your hard work is questioned. When your housekeeping standards are judged by her white-gloved finger across furniture and subsequent pursed lips. When those menial tasks you have performed over and over, and without incident, are scrutinized. When you (and the state of your linen cupboard) are the unwilling recipient of unrequired and unhelpful advice.

Or perhaps it’s the other way, and you find yourself having to articulate the importance of housekeeping, of putting things away, washing the dishes and keeping your new duck-egg-blue Mud platter out of the dishwasher. In either case we are all familiar with that feeling of tension and unease that visits of this kind bring with them.

You can find yourself defending your safety management system and/or trying to explain the importance of it. Playing nice and toeing the line can be stressful and challenging. Not unlike being visited by your mother-in-law, being prepared and planning ahead is critical.

Here’s our ‘to-do list’ for such visits:

  • Get your house in order; prepare for the meeting or the site visit by making sure that your housekeeping is up to date and personal protective equipment is being used;
  • Be proud of what you have, be ready to talk about the positives and to share your knowledge of the role of safety in the business and how your safety framework hangs together;
  • Be prepared to respond to any knowledge shortfalls about the business, the risks in the business, your safety record, areas of improvement and challenges;
  • Prepare your workforce and keep them informed – the more they are the more likely they will be to keep their mind on their job and not of their job security;

Be sure you stay open to new ideas and differing perspectives, After all, sometimes mother does know best. Recognise that the change brings an opportunity to learn something new that improves the way you are managing your health and safety practices.