On May 24, twelve U.S. congressmen – eleven Republican – sent a letter to the Government Accountability Office (GAO) requesting information on how the U.S. financial system’s regulatory structure affects the relationship between financial firms and fintech companies. This request follows a separate April 18 letter from three Democratic senators requesting that the GAO complete a study on the fintech industry, and comes after a GAO report, which was published in February but publicly released in March, that assessed the U.S. financial system’s regulatory structure, including the impacts of fragmentation and overlap in financial regulation. The most recent letter requests that the GAO supplement its February report by providing information concerning: (i) how the GAO’s findings of fragmentation and overlap in financial regulation “slowed or otherwise harmed innovation, and restricted the ability of financial firms . . . from pursuing new technological ventures”; (ii) how collaboration between financial firms and fintech companies has “helped financial firms streamline processes and become more efficient in delivering products and services”; (iii) “what challenges . . . both financial institutions and fintech companies have with the existing regulatory structure”; and (iv) how federal regulators can “streamline” collaboration between financial firms and fintech ventures, and what best practices U.S. regulators can consider to foster a “culture of collaboration” – such as the “regulatory sandbox” offered by the U.K. Financial Conduct Authority’s Project Innovate.