On February 4, the European Central Bank (“ECB“) published a response of the ECB and the national central banks of member states of the eurozone (Eurosystem) to the European Commission’s call for evidence on the EU regulatory framework for financial services.

The Eurosystem’s response makes the following remarks:

  • the financial crisis led to much-needed and far-reaching reform of the European regulatory framework and a redesign of its supervisory architecture;
  • the regulatory framework for banks is largely in place, but a few important initiatives on the regulatory agenda for banks and the non-bank sector still need to be finished;
  • initiatives to support the financing of the economy should maintain the robustness of the regulatory framework which resulted from the post-crisis reforms;
  • reaping long-term benefits implies both assuming temporary costs that emerge in the transitional period and complementing regulation with measures to correct any unintended long-term impacts that are identified;
  • it is important to ensure that regulations are able to preserve financial stability, while leaving sufficient room for markets to develop and fully play their role in the economy; and
  • the European exercise should take into account ongoing initiatives at the international level.

The Eurosystem’s response aims to provide evidence from recent impact studies of the effects of the new regulatory framework and to highlight areas where possible improvements could be made, including: (i) rules affecting the ability of the economy to finance itself and to grow; (ii) unnecessary regulatory burdens; (iii) interactions of individual rules, as well as inconsistencies and gaps in the existing regulations; and (iv) rules giving rise to unintended consequences. Response.