Publications/guidance

New care models and prevention: an integral partnership This report, jointly published by NHS Confederation, NHS Clinical Commissioners, NHS Providers and the Local Government Association, presents five case studies to highlight how vanguards have sought to address the health and wellbeing gap and the impacts seen so far. It finds that a reduction in emergency admissions for the over-65s, fewer delayed transfers of care, and GPs able to dedicate more time to frail older patients are among some of the early achievements of pioneering prevention initiatives taking root across the country. 

Discharging older patients from hospital. The health and social care system’s management of discharging older patients from hospital does not represent value for money. 

A different ending: Addressing inequalities in end of life care. People from certain groups in society sometimes experience poorer quality care at the end of their lives because providers do not always understand or fully consider their needs.

Discharging older patients from hospital. This NAO report finds that there are currently far too many older people in hospitals who do not need to be there and without radical action, this problem will worsen and add further financial strain to the NHS and local government. The spending watchdog estimates that the gross annual cost to the NHS of treating older patients in hospital who no longer need to receive acute clinical care is in the region of £820m. While some efforts to rectify the situation have been made, an ageing population and more older people being admitted to hospital means there needs to be a step change in performance to resolve the problem. The NAO makes a number of recommendations, including that the DH, NHS England and NHS Improvement should set out how they will break the trend of rising delays against the demographic challenge of growing numbers of older people.

A report of investigations into unsafe discharge from hospital. This report by the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman draws attention to the consequences of health and social care organisations failing to manage people’s discharge from hospital. It finds that patients are being sent home alone, afraid and unable to cope and in some cases without their relatives or carers being told, resulting in devastating consequences. The report highlights cases investigated by the PHSO service where people have been discharged from hospital before they are fit to leave or without making sure they can cope on their return home. 

Better care in my hands: a review of how people are involved in their care. This report describes how well people are involved in their own care and what good involvement looks like. It is based on newly analysed evidence from our national reports and inspection findings, as well as national patient surveys and a literature review. It identifies what enables people and their families to work in partnership with health and social care staff and illustrates this with good practice examples from our inspection findings. 

Adult personal social services: specific revenue funding and grant allocations for 2016/17. This letter clarifies local authority specific revenue funding for the financial year 2016 to 2017, which was subject to the 2015 spending review. It provides information on funding for the second year of Care Act implementation, which comes from a range of sources, as well as allocations for parts of the Better Care Fund. 

State of caring 2016. This report shows that, one year on from the implementation of the Care Act 2014, carers in England are still struggling to get the support they need to care well, maintain their own health, balance work and care, and have a life of their own outside of caring. It calls for the government, local authorities and health bodies to redouble their efforts to support England’s 5.4 million unpaid carers, arguing that squeezed public services and financial pressures are pushing carers to the brink. 

Training in care for the dying must improve, says GMC. More needs to be done to prepare medical students and newly qualified doctors to provide care for the dying, according to the General Medical Council's (GMC) Chief Executive Niall Dickson. The GMC has pledged to work with medical schools to improve the palliative care training available for medical students. 

A different ending: Addressing inequalities in end of life care. This CQC review finds that people from certain groups in society sometimes experience poorer quality care at the end of their lives because providers and commissioners do not always understand or fully consider their needs. The CQC looked at how dying patients are treated across various settings. In particular, it focused on end of life care for people who may be less likely to receive good care, whether because of diagnosis, age, ethnic background, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability or social circumstances. It identified examples of good practice, but found that action is needed to make sure everyone has the same access to high quality, personalised care at the end of their lives, regardless of their diagnosis, age, ethnic background, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability or social circumstances. 

Achieving outcomes based commissioning in home care: outcomes-based commissioning (OBC) is a means of procuring home care for people which focuses less on the tasks associated with addressing individual needs and more on improved overall outcomes for individuals. This report outlines the work that LGiU has completed recently in OBC for home care, introduces the CoCare app which supports outcomes-based commissioning and summarises a March roundtable hosted by LGiU. 

News

In the bag - making moving between hospital and social care better. The introduction of a 'red bag' Hospital Transfer Pathway has helped to improve and speed up the transfer between hospital and care home settings.