Forget me not. Twitter launched just eight years ago with this tweet from company co-founder, Jack Dorsey:

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(Not nearly as dramatic as “Mr. Watson—come here—I want to see you”— but I digress.)  Since that inaugural tweet, hundreds of billions of tweets have flowed through Twitter’s network, with 500 million new tweets every day. Yet, consistent with Twitter’s eccentric ways (no message over 140 characters, please), there has never been a way to search this massive treasure trove of tweets. Indeed, Twitter didn’t even get around to incorporating search functionality into its platform until 2011 (five years after that first tweet), and that functionality was limited to searching only very recent tweets—there was no way to access tweets more than a week or so old. Enter Twitter’s new search engine, just out this month, allowing users to search tweets new and old. This new functionality is limited to fairly basic keyword searches right now, but Twitter expects to expand it very soon to encompass more flexible and complex queries. In the meanwhile, if you’re gearing up for a job search any time soon, you might want to delete those ill-advised drunken tweets from three years ago.

Dead air. There’s a common view in the tech industry that cutting-edge, transformative business models simply move too quickly for the law to regulate effectively—by the time that the courts get around to addressing the legal issues raised by such a business model, the genie is out of the bottle, the transformation has occurred and any resulting court decisions are too late to have any real impact. But then there’s Aereo. The once high-flying TV-over-the-Internet start-up promised to transform how we access television programming, to the acclaim of cord cutters everywhere (or at least in those carefully selected judicial circuits where Aereo had rolled out its service). And then the U.S. Supreme Court intervened, clipping the company’s wings—in a landmark decision, the court held that Aereo ran afoul of copyright law by engaging in unauthorized public performances of TV programs (our summary of that decision can be found here.)  In a stark reminder that Supreme Court decisions have very real consequences—even for hot start-ups using cool, disruptive technologies—Aereo has now filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Even in defeat, however, Aereo will live on, at least in spirit—it has inspired a new generation of entrepreneurial companies in the TV space, and perhaps has prodded traditional media companies to explore online streaming of their TV programs. And, of course, despite the Supreme Court’s efforts to limit the scope of its ruling, the Aereo decision will be endlessly debated by courts, litigants and copyright scholars for years to come, shaping the future of our media landscape.

This is your refrigerator speaking—you’re low on milk. To date, the Internet of Things (IoT)—which includes digitally connected thermostats, medical devices, refrigerators, toaster ovens, bread boxes, toothbrushes and the like—hasn’t seemed to live up to its hype. But maybe it’s just a matter of time. In a recent report, BI Intelligence predicts that, by 2019, IoT will result in $1.7 trillion in value added to the world’s economy and the total value of IoT devices will be more than double the size of the smartphone, PC, tablet, connected car and the wearable market combined. Perhaps—but, looking into our own crystal ball, we’re skeptical that these massive numbers will be reached in that time frame unless the IoT industry effectively addresses the privacy and data security concernsraised by IoT devices in the home.

(Not nearly as dramatic as “Mr. Watson—come here—I want to see you”— but I digress.)  Since that inaugural tweet, hundreds of billions of tweets have flowed through Twitter’s network, with 500 million new tweets every day. Yet, consistent with Twitter’s eccentric ways (no message over 140 characters, please), there has never been a way to search this massive treasure trove of tweets. Indeed, Twitter didn’t even get around to incorporating search functionality into its platform until 2011 (five years after that first tweet), and that functionality was limited to searching only very recent tweets—there was no way to access tweets more than a week or so old. Enter Twitter’s new search engine, just out this month, allowing users to search tweets new and old. This new functionality is limited to fairly basic keyword searches right now, but Twitter expects to expand it very soon to encompass more flexible and complex queries. In the meanwhile, if you’re gearing up for a job search any time soon, you might want to delete those ill-advised drunken tweets from three years ago.

Dead air. There’s a common view in the tech industry that cutting-edge, transformative business models simply move too quickly for the law to regulate effectively—by the time that the courts get around to addressing the legal issues raised by such a business model, the genie is out of the bottle, the transformation has occurred and any resulting court decisions are too late to have any real impact. But then there’s Aereo. The once high-flying TV-over-the-Internet start-up promised to transform how we access television programming, to the acclaim of cord cutters everywhere (or at least in those carefully selected judicial circuits where Aereo had rolled out its service). And then the U.S. Supreme Court intervened, clipping the company’s wings—in a landmark decision, the court held that Aereo ran afoul of copyright law by engaging in unauthorized public performances of TV programs (our summary of that decision can be found here.)  In a stark reminder that Supreme Court decisions have very real consequences—even for hot start-ups using cool, disruptive technologies—Aereo has now filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Even in defeat, however, Aereo will live on, at least in spirit—it has inspired a new generation of entrepreneurial companies in the TV space, and perhaps has prodded traditional media companies to explore online streaming of their TV programs. And, of course, despite the Supreme Court’s efforts to limit the scope of its ruling, the Aereo decision will be endlessly debated by courts, litigants and copyright scholars for years to come, shaping the future of our media landscape.

This is your refrigerator speaking—you’re low on milk. To date, the Internet of Things (IoT)—which includes digitally connected thermostats, medical devices, refrigerators, toaster ovens, bread boxes, toothbrushes and the like—hasn’t seemed to live up to its hype. But maybe it’s just a matter of time. In a recent report, BI Intelligence predicts that, by 2019, IoT will result in $1.7 trillion in value added to the world’s economy and the total value of IoT devices will be more than double the size of the smartphone, PC, tablet, connected car and the wearable market combined. Perhaps—but, looking into our own crystal ball, we’re skeptical that these massive numbers will be reached in that time frame unless the IoT industry effectively addresses the privacy and data security concerns raised by IoT devices in the home.