In Weiss v. National Westminster Bank PLC, 768 F.3d 202 (2d Cir. 2014) (No. 13-1618), plaintiffs sued defendant bank for civil remedies pursuant to the Antiterrorism Act, 18 U.S.C. §§ 2331, 2333 and 2339 (ATA), claiming that defendant provided material support and resources to a foreign terrorist organization by maintaining bank accounts and transferring funds for Interpal, a group which is alleged to have supported Hamas.  The district court granted summary judgment in favor of defendant, ruling that plaintiffs failed to establish a triable issue of fact as to whether defendant had the requisite scienter.  The Second Circuit reversed, holding that the district court had applied the wrong standard in its scienter analysis by focusing on whether defendant had knowledge that, or exhibited deliberate indifference to whether, Interpal funded terrorist activities.  The Second Circuit concluded that the statute’s requirement is less exacting, and requires only a showing that defendant had knowledge that, or exhibited deliberate indifference to whether, Interpal provided material support to a terrorist organization, irrespective of whether that support actually aided terrorist activities.  Because Hamas is designated as a foreign terrorist organization by the U.S. Secretary of State, plaintiff need only show that defendant actually knew that, or exhibited deliberate indifference to whether, Interpal provided material support to Hamas.  The court concluded that on that issue, plaintiffs had raised a triable issue of fact.