Congress’s complex relationship with prescription drugs was on display today in the House of Representatives.  In the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform (OGR), Martin Shkreli pleaded the 5th at a hearing investigating drug pricing.  Meanwhile, the Energy and Commerce Committee (E&C) held a hearing regarding implementation of biosimilars.  While all the attention will be on the former, the latter was more important, especially for participants in the biosimilar space.

First, the OGR Committee was a media show built around the flamboyant Shkreli.  Shkreli took the 5th when given the opportunity to testify and later tweeted – after being excused from the hearing for refusing to answer any of the Members questions – that the Committee Members were ‘imbeciles’.  The tone of the hearing was very aggressive towards drug pricing and what were described as unsavory business practices. Members were also critical of the FDA generic drug programs.  However, Member interest in strengthening the program to bring competition to the marketplace was clear. Dr. Janet Woodcock, Director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the FDA,  stated that funds collected as a result of the Generic Drug User Free Amendments (GDUFA) helped expedite the review process and that by October there will be a 10-month review process on all new applications. The Senate HELP Committee held a hearing last week on reauthorization of GDUFA, which will expire next year, and this bipartisan interest, coupled with the prescription drug cost crisis, could lead to increased resources for the FDA review process. Beyond some public shaming of specific drug companies, there was little suggestion of substantive action on drug pricing.

Second, the E&C Committee was less about drug pricing, but more so about the ability of manufacturers to get new biosimilar products to the market. Notably, Committee Members on BOTH sides of the aisle were critical of CMS for trying to price biosimilars more like generic drugs and categorize different products under a single billing code.  They said the CMS ruling undermines the intent of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2010 (BPCIA) by removing incentives for a robust marketplace. Biologics make up a $200 billion market, so the consequences of policy decisions are significant. Members were also critical of delays in approving more biosimilars and issuing guidance on product labeling. Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ) asked if additional appropriations would address these problems, to which Dr. Woodcock replied that she’s more concerned the FDA will be unprepared for a rapid expansion of the biosimilar market.

While 2016 may be devoted to campaigning against drug prices, the Committees responsible for the regulatory regimes for drugs are still very focused on preserving the ability of manufacturers to successfully bring drugs to the market.  That is a much bigger deal than the plethora of Martin Shkreli smirks you will be subjected to in the media.