Recently, Epstein Becker & Green attorneys Michelle Capezza, Christopher Farella, Laurajane Kastner and Patrick Lucignani attended the New Jersey Technology Council (NJTC) 2015 Annual Meeting held on July 15, 2015 at the Forsgate Country Club in Monroe, NJ. A dynamic panel discussed many innovative ways technology is being used in today’s sports and how it may be used in the future. Tools have emerged to assist in coaching, refereeing and reviewing plays, as well as the development of sensors and technology to protect player safety, virtual player training techniques and video analytics to confirm infractions and potential safety hazards, just to name a few. John Nisi, Regional Chief Technology Officer for Microsoft Consulting Services remarked that one of the biggest challenges in designing these technologies is determining how to bring technology into the game without interfering with the fabric of the game. And many U.S. sports leagues, such as the NFL, NHL, NBA, MLB, and NASCAR, are eager to utilize these new technologies but they must be designed and tailored to the needs of their particular sports, including the environments in which their sports are played. Chip Foley, VP of Sports & Entertainment at High Point Solutions, and Adam Davis, Chief Revenue Officer for the Prudential Center & NJ Devils also noted the challenges associated with developing the required infrastructure in sports arenas and venues that can support the new apps and technologies being introduced. Ian Goldberg, Founder and CEO of iSports360, offered yet another perspective involving use of mobile technologies for youth sports coaches and parents that can assist with training, coaching and managing performance expectations of young athletes. When asked about sports fan technology, the panelists noted that video, interactive and visualization technologies for fans will become more prevalent.

Technology companies interested in developing the apps and new technologies that will be useful and appealing to the sports market, as well as the organizations using these technologies, have a lot to consider. The amount of data alone that can be collected with these technologies will transform how sports are played, viewed, analyzed and even bet on. Undoubtedly, concerns regarding data privacy and security will need to be addressed. Further, as panelists remarked, introduction of new technologies to the game often requires related revisions of rules and regulations governing the sport. The possibilities are limitless, and perhaps the game will never be the same.

The NJTC is a not-for-profit, trade association which focuses on connecting decision-makers and thought-leaders from technology and technology support companies through access to financing opportunities, networking, and business support. Through its programs, the NJTC provides timely business information to help its members grow and succeed and provides forums for member companies to work together to advance New Jersey’s, and the region’s, status as a leading technology center. For more information regarding The New Jersey Technology Council, visit www.njtc.org.