Seyfarth Synopsis: In case you missed it, on June 22, 2016, Chicago added itself to the growing roster of many major U.S. cities to pass a Paid Sick Leave Ordinance.

The Council’s Committee on Workforce Development and Audit passed the Chicago Minimum Wage and Paid Sick Leave Ordinance (“PSLO”), which amends the Chicago Minimum Wage Ordinance e (2-25-050).

The new ordinance is effective July 1, 2017. Thus, employers with employees in Chicago must be aware of the major provisions and requirements of the PSLO, which are summarized below and more thoroughly explained by our colleagues here.

Summary of Major Provisions

  • Effective Date: July 1, 2017
  • Covered Employers: Any individual or entity with one or more employee that maintains a business facility within the city of Chicago or that is subject to city licensing requirements.
  • Covered Employees[1]: Employees working 80 hours within any 120-day period.
  • Eligibility: Employees must be eligible to use paid sick leave (“PSL”) no later than 180 days after the first calendar day of their continuous employment, unless the employer sets an earlier date.
  • Accrual: Employees must begin accruing PSL on the first calendar day after the commencement of their employment, or on the effective date of the PSLO (July 1, 2017) if already employed, at a minimum rate of one hour for every 40 hours worked.[2]
  • PSL Caps: Employers may cap accrual and use of PSL at 40 hours per 12-month period, but are free to set a higher limit.
  • Qualifying Usage: An employee may use paid sick leave for the following purposes: (1) employee or a covered family member is ill or injured, or is receiving medical diagnosis, care, or treatment, or preventive medical or health care;(2) absence of employee or the employee’s family member related to domestic violence or “a sex offense”; and (3) closure of employee’s place of business or the employee’s child’s school or place of care by order of a public official due to a public health emergency.
  • Unused PSL: Employees must be permitted to carry over half of any unused accrued PSL from year to year, up to a max of 20 hours. In addition, if the employer is subject to the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), employees can carry over up to 40 hours exclusively for FMLA-eligible purposes. However, if an employee carries over and uses the additional 40 FMLA hours, they cannot use more than an additional 20 hours of PSL in that 12-month period. Employers are not required to pay out unused PSL from year to year or upon termination.
  • Notice to Employer: If an employee’s need for PSL is reasonably foreseeable, an employer may require up to seven days’ notice. If an employee’s need for PSL is not reasonably foreseeable, an employer may only require notice as soon as practicable on the day intended for PSL.
  • Medical Certification: If an employee is absent for more than three consecutive work days, an employer may require certification that the PSL was in fact used for covered purposes.
  • No Retaliation, Discipline or Coverage: Employers cannot retaliate against or discipline employees for use of PSL and cannot require employees to find coverage for hours missed due to use of PSL.
  • Notice of the PSLO to Employees: Every covered employer must (1) post notice of the PSLO at each facility where covered employees work (with in the City of Chicago) and (2) provide notice advising covered employees of the PSLO with their first paycheck issues after the PSLO is passed.

Takeaway for Employers:

Employers with employees in the City of Chicago must ensure their leave policies are in compliance. We will continue to monitor news related to the ordinance and will provide any updates here. In the meantime, please contact the author or your Seyfarth attorney if you a have any questions regarding the PSLO, or if you would like help reviewing your paid sick leave policies for compliance with state and local laws.