Amicus briefs were far less common on the criminal side of the docket during these early years of our period. The Court accepted three amicus briefs in non-unanimous criminal decisions in 2000, and one each among unanimous criminal decisions in 2001, non-unanimous criminal decisions in 2002 and 2004, and unanimous criminal decisions in 2004. In 2006, the Court accepted three amicus briefs in non-unanimous criminal decisions.

Click here to view table. 

All this, of course, adds up to a very low median number of amicus briefs per case for criminal cases. In 2000, the Court averaged 0.05 amicus briefs in non-unanimous decisions. The following year, the Court averaged 0.3 briefs in unanimous decisions. The following year, the Court averaged 0.03 amicus briefs in non-unanimous cases. In 2004, the Court averaged 0.8 amicus briefs in non-unanimous criminal cases to 0.02 briefs per case in unanimous decisions. Finally, in 2006, the Court averaged 0.2 amicus briefs per non-unanimous decision.

Click here to view table. 

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to amicus briefs between 2008 and 2015.