Today, the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas issued a nationwide preliminary injunction halting the Department of Labor’s (“DOL”) controversial new Persuader Rule and its new Advice Exemption Interpretation, previously discussed here and here.  The Rule and Interpretation marked a dramatic change by requiring public financial disclosure reports concerning payments that employers make in connection with “indirect persuader activities” that were not reportable under the long standing rules, but that would, if the new rule were to take effect, for the first time, be considered reportable as persuader activity.

Injunction Issues Just In Time

The injunction was issued in advance of the July 1, 2016, enforcement date, which the DOL had stated employers, and labor relations consultants, including attorneys, would need to start reporting engagements covered by the new Rule and Interpretation.  Employers and attorneys have raised concerns about the impact on the attorney-client privilege, including the chilling effect and interference with their ability to obtain/provide advice traditionally exempt from disclosure.

In granting the injunction, the Court concluded:

[The DOL is] hereby enjoined on a national basis  from implementing any and all aspects of the United States Department of Labor’s Persuader Advice Exemption Rule (“Advice Exemption Interpretation”), as published in 81 Fed. Reg. 15,924, et seq., pending a final resolution of the merits of this case or until a further order of this Court, the United States Court of Appeals for the Firth Circuit or the United States Supreme Court.  The scope of this injunction is nationwide.

District Court Order Provides Employers Comprehensive Victory

The Northern District of Texas went one step further than the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota, which last week ruled that the DOL’s Persuader Rule exceeded the agencies authority under the LMRDA, but stopped short of issuing an injunction.  The Court’s Order here gives employers a comprehensive victory, finding not only a substantial threat of irreparable harm but also that the Texas plaintiffs will likely succeed in establishing:

  • The DOL exceeded its authority in promulgating its new Advice Exemption Interpretation in the new Persuader Rule;
  • The new Advice Exemption Interpretation is arbitrary, capricious and an abuse of discretion;
  • The new Advice Exemption Interpretation violates free speech and association rights under the First Amendment;
  • The new Advice Exemption Interpretation is unconstitutionally vague; and
  • The new Advice Exemption Interpretation violates the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

Preliminary Injunction May Only Be Temporary Reprieve for Employers

Obviously a preliminary Injunction is just that, preliminary and temporary in nature.  It is anticipated that the DOL will file an appeal and, depending on the results of the Presidential Election later this year, this could be a looming threat for employers for some time.

Accordingly, employers should first do all they can, including signing long-term agreements with law firms and/or labor relations consultants before July 1, to be prepared in the event the Rule ultimately becomes effective, so as to potentially shield themselves from the obligation to report and disclose so-called indirect persuader activity that has been exempt from reporting under the former rules.