Target ends its multi-state data breach litigation over its 2013 data breach with an $18.5 million settlement to 47 states. While the settlement outlines the type of security measures companies should employ in order to not be found negligent with customer data, it doesn’t go far enough to improve organizational security. The bulk of the settlement terms are still defensive in nature when it comes to data breaches. As such, companies looking to follow the terms of Target’s settlement should be cautioned to use offensive tactics to prevent such attacks if they want to avoid litigation.

In 2013, while Target’s security systems had detected the breach, no one understood the significance of, or acted upon, the alerts, resulting in the massive data breach given the delay in response time. Target has since toughened its security systems and made significant improvements. The terms of the settlement give Target 180 days to develop, implement, and maintain a comprehensive security program. However, this requirement refers to the changes the retailer has already implemented. While the settlement reiterates some of the basics, such as having a comprehensive security program, segmenting the network, and implementing stricter access control policies to sensitive networks and data, future data breach lawsuits may use the Target settlement to try to prove an organization did not go far enough in protecting personal information and other sensitive data. As such, abiding by the terms of the Target settlement is a first step for companies looking to avoid data breach litigation, but further tactics will be required for companies to go on the offensive to prevent breaches as the plaintiffs’ bar will try to use the Target settlement as a varying degree of negligence in pushing forward with future litigation.