For many years, medical plan drafting was viewed as a commodity. Insurance companies, third-party administrators and brokers often prepared summary plan descriptions and plan documents for self-insured medical plans using form documents. With the passage of the Affordable Care Act and other health-care related laws, however, medical claims, appeals and litigation have increased exponentially. In many instances, the terms of the plan documents have been outcome-determinative with respect to these disputes. There never has been a better time for an employer to step back and take a comprehensive review of the terms of the employer’s self-insured medical plan document and summary plan description, not only for compliance reasons but also to put the employer in the best position in the event of any dispute. The following are three drafting tips which might be considered during such a review.

Avoiding the “Kitchen Sink” Appeal. Increasingly, our clients have been receiving lengthy appeals of denied claims for benefits. We refer to these epistles as “kitchen sink appeals” because the authors of the letters seemingly throw in everything but the kitchen sink. A typical kitchen sink appeal is prepared on behalf of an out-of-network provider who claims standing to appeal based on an assignment of benefits by a plan participant. A kitchen sink appeal is often a “cut-and paste” compilation of 25 pages or more, usually containing long passages and references to cases which appear to have no bearing whatsoever on the appeal. Usually, only one or two pages of a kitchen sink appeal contain any marginally relevant point, and yet the claims administrator must respond to the appeal in compliance with the strict requirements of the ERISA claims procedures.

One manner of dealing with these nuisance appeals is to draft the medical plan document to prohibit the assignment of claims to third parties. Courts have uniformly recognized the enforceability of anti-assignment clauses, which are particularly effective in preventing kitchen sink appeals made by out-of-network providers who seek through litigation higher reimbursement amounts than they could negotiate with the plan directly.

Subrogation Provisions. Medical plans should include carefully drafted subrogation provisions which are informed by Supreme Court precedent in Sereboff v. Mid Atlantic Medical Services, Inc. and U.S. Airways v. McCutchen. For example, a well-drafted subrogation provision will expressly state that the common law “make-whole doctrine” does not apply and will require plan participants to do nothing to prejudice the plan’s subrogation rights.

On March 30, the Supreme Court announced it would review the Eleventh Circuit’s decision in Board of Trustees of the National Elevator Industrial Health Benefit Plan v. Montanile, another medical plan case involving subrogation. The Supreme Court’s decision in Montanile may further inform best practices in drafting medical plan subrogation provisions in self-funded plans.

Plan Limitation Periods. The period of time during which a plan participant may bring a lawsuit in connection with a claim for medical benefits is typically governed by the most analogous state statute of limitations, which may be as long as ten years. A medical plan may be drafted, however, to shorten the limitations period for bringing such a lawsuit. Recent cases have upheld such provisions, provided they are reasonable and afford a long enough period of time to file a lawsuit after the administrative appeals process has been completed.