As we’ve noted previously, the Convention on Supplementary Compensation (CSC) entered into force in mid-2015, following the decision by Japan to join the CSC. At that time, other members of the CSC included the United States, Argentina, Morocco, Romania, and the United Arab Emirates. You can now add India to that list. 

On February 4, 2016, India submitted the Instrument of Ratification of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) to the International Atomic Energy Agency. India declared, in accordance with paragraph 1 of Article XVIII of the CSC, that its national law complies with the provisions of the Annex to the Convention. India noted that it has enacted the Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage Act of 2010 to provide for civil liability for nuclear damage and prompt compensation to the victims of a nuclear incident through a no-fault liability regime channeling liability to the operator. India also stated that the Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage Act of 2010 complies with the provisions of the Annex to the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage.

Although this has been in the works for some time, it is nevertheless another sign – along with the creation of India’s insurance pool – of accelerating progress for India’s nuclear program. With multiple sites set aside for large nuclear stations and talks apparently ongoing with several international vendors and suppliers, announcements of contracts for a substantial new build program may be just around the corner. The sooner the better if India aims to achieve its goal of developing more than 40 GW of new nuclear capacity in the next 20 years.