People.com is reporting that Amber Heard, who received a $7 million settlement in her divorce from Johnny Depp this week, is donating the entire $7 million settlement to charities with “a particular focus to stop violence against women” as well as the Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles.

In light of this newsworthy charitable donation, we thought now would be a good time to remind everyone of some of the basic income tax deductions available for gifts to charities.

Section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”) governs income tax deductions for charitable contributions. In the case of an individual making a cash gift to a Section 501(c)(3) organization classified as a “public charity” (such as churches, schools, hospitals, and governmental units), the gift is deductible for federal income tax purposes so long as the aggregate gifts do not exceed fifty percent (50%) of the taxpayer’s adjusted gross income (“AGI”) for the taxable year.

In the case of a contribution of capital gain property to a public charity, a taxpayer can only deduct such contributions up to thirty percent (30%) of the taxpayer’s AGI for the taxable year. The amount of capital gain property contributed is taken into account after all other charitable contributions to public charities. Therefore, if the taxpayer contributes 30% of his or her AGI in non-capital gain assets and 30% of his or her AGI in capital gain assets, the non-capital gain assets will be applied first, then 20% of the capital gain property will be allowed, with the remaining 10% exceeding the taxpayer’s total 50% limit. Any excess contributions will be treated as a contribution in each of the five succeeding taxable years.

If a taxpayer contributes cash to a Section 501(c)(3) organization that is not classified as a public charity, such as to a private non-operating foundation, then the deductions for such contributions may not exceed the lesser of thirty percent (30%) of the taxpayer’s AGI or the excess of fifty percent (50%) of the taxpayer’s AGI for the taxable year over the amount of contributions of cash made to public charities.

If a taxpayer contributes capital gain property to a Section 501(c)(3) organization that is not classified as a public charity, then the amount of the contributions allowable for deduction purposes shall not exceed the lesser of twenty percent (20%) of the taxpayer’s AGI for the taxable year, or “the excess of thirty percent (30%) of the taxpayer’s AGI for the taxable year over the amount of the contributions of capital gain property” to public charities. Contributions of capital gain property to which this twenty percent (20%) limitation apply shall be taken into account after all other charitable contributions. Any excess contributions will be treated as a charitable contribution of capital gain property in each of the five succeeding taxable years.