Since I first learned about AI more than 40 years ago I was hoping that AI would help improve society, and when in studying law I was hopeful that lawyers could use AI.  Recent AI advancements may be the beginning of practical AI since it includes improved Internet search which clearly could help lawyers which would help clients, courts, and society.  A recent report included updated in AI which include “car-safety systems that detect pedestrians and bicyclists, as well as in video game controls, Internet search and factory robots.”

A New York Times December 10, 2015 report entitled “A Learning Advance in Artificial Intelligence Rivals Human Abilities” included a discussion about that the new AI is a “program is capable of quickly learning the characters in a range of languages and generalizing from what it has learned.”  This new approach is:

…known as Bayesian Program Learning, or B.P.L., is different from current machine learning technologies known as deep neural networks.

Neural networks can be trained to recognize human speech, detect objects in images or identify kinds of behavior by being exposed to large sets of examples.

The New York Times report was based on the work of researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, New York University and the University of Toronto which was published in Science entitled “Human-level concept learning through probabilistic program induction.”

I hope the legal community takes time to consider AI.