The Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) has made sort of a name for itself by issuing cryptic penalty announcements where it is a considerable challenge to figure out what went on and why the unfortunate company that has been whacked with an “agreed” fine got itself tangled up with OFAC in the first place. But the recent penalty slapped on Gil Tours Travel for some vague violation of the Cuba sanctions takes the cake or, I suppose, el pastel.

According to the penalty announcement, Gil was being fined because “dealt in property in which Cuba or Cuban nationals had an interest, by providing Cuba travel-related services involving 191 individuals, without authorization from OFAC,” which is pretty much like saying Gil broke the rules when it broke the rules. But here’s the kicker. In discussing aggravating factors, OFAC says this:

Gil Travel had some awareness that it was providing Cuba-related travel services, and that its conduct could be in violation of the CACR [Cuban Assets Control Regulations]

Say what? It had “some awareness” that it was providing Cuba-related travel service and that this “could” be in violation of the rules? What on earth does that mean? How can you not know whether you are providing Cuba-related services? Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades, not rule violations. It’s a binary thing: you either are or are not providing those services and, if you are, you know it. Don’t count on any clarification from OFAC to help anyone figure out what happened here.

Apparently the owner of Gil Tours told (subscription required) Law360 sort of what was going on, although his explanation is not a model of clarity either.

Gil’s president and CEO Igal Hami told Law360 on Wednesday by email that … its only involvement with the trips under investigation was in referring nonprofit agencies that had OFAC licenses to arrange Cuban travel to another tour operator that also had a license.

So, apparently (if this is true), OFAC thinks you violate the CACR if you refer someone to a licensed tour operator unless you have a license to make that referral. In other words, if I included a link here to a licensed provider of people-to-people tours to Cuba, I would be breaking OFAC rules because I don’t have a license to make that referral. No wonder OFAC didn’t want to let on what happened here.

(I’m really, reallyreally hoping someone at OFAC clicked the link above to see if I had committed this violation. Explanation here.)