Every now and then a case comes along to remind us that violators of occupational health and safety legislation can be sent to jail.

Mind you, this case involved not only serious safety violations, but also deceit and illegal dumping.

An Ontario contractor has been jailed for 30 days and fined $45,000, after a successful prosecution by the Ontario Ministry of Labour, for violating the asbestos regulation under the Ontario Occupational Health and Safety Act.

According to the Ministry of Labour court bulletin, on two separate dates in 2014, the contractor, along with at least one of his workers, went to a residential home to remove asbestos-containing insulation from the attic.

The contractor did not separate and seal off the work area; did not have any decontamination facilities in place; did not identify the work area with any signs warning of an asbestos dust hazard; did not wear protective clothing; and he and his worker wore respirators that were not fit-tested and on which they were not trained. Further, the contractor did not notify the Ministry of Labour of the asbestos removal work as required by the asbestos regulation. The contractor had told the homeowner that the removal work was being done in accordance with the asbestos regulation, and that the contractor was certified to do the work, but neither was true. The homeowner and two other people were in the home while the work was being done.

The Ministry of Labour, Ministry of Environment and police got involved when someone reported that vacuum bags with asbestos-containing insulation had been illegally dumped on private property.

After a trial, the contractor was found guilty on nine charges under the Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulation 278/05 (“Designated Substance – Asbestos on Construction Projects and in Buildings and Repair Operations”) under the OHSA.  The court stated that this was a case of clear deceit and misrepresentation by the contractor and total disregard for the health and safety of workers and the public.

The court then imposed the thirty-day jail sentence and $45,000 fine.

The Ministry of Labour’s court bulletin may be accessed here.