The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently took two actions involving the use of the claim “healthy” on food labels. First, FDA opened a docket to solicit comments on whether, and if so how, to revise the criteria that must be meet in order for a food to bear the claim “healthy.” This reflects changes in public health recommendations for various nutrients since FDA first published the criteria for making “healthy” food labeling claims in 1993. For example, FDA’s view of healthy dietary patterns now focuses on food groups and the type of fat rather than the total amount of fat in a food. Food manufacturers can continue to use the term “healthy” on foods that meet the current regulations while FDA further considers any comments submitted.

Second, FDA issued Guidance announcing that it does not intend to enforce certain regulatory requirements for products that use the term “healthy.” Specifically, FDA says it will not take enforcement action against a food that bears the claim “healthy” but which does not meet the regulatory definition of low fat provided that: (1) The amounts of mono- and polyunsaturated fats in the food are declared on the label; and (2) the sums of mono- and polyunsaturated fats are greater than the total saturated fat content of the food. Similarly, FDA will not take enforcement action with respect to the current regulatory requirement that any food bearing a “healthy” claim contain at least 10 percent of the Daily Value (DV) of vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, iron, protein, or fiber if, instead, the food contains at least 10 percent of the DV of potassium or vitamin D. These two changes reflect the most-recent dietary guidance. For fat, the recommendations have shifted from limiting total fat intake to encouraging consumption of mono- and polyunsaturated fats. For mineral and vitamin content, potassium and vitamin D are now nutrients of public health concern, while vitamins A and C are no longer nutrients of public health concern.

A copy of FDA’s “Healthy” Guidance is attached here.