The IRS has released the 2016 inflation-adjusted amounts for health savings accounts (HSAs) and high-deductible health plans (HDHPs).

HDHP Minimums and Maximums. The minimum annual deductible for an HDHP will be $1,300 for self-only coverage and $2,600 for family coverage. These amounts have not changed from the 2015 amounts. The maximum annual out-of-pocket for an HDHP will increase to $6,550 for self-only coverage and $13,100 for family coverage.

"Embedded" ACA Out-of-Pocket Maximum. The Affordable Care Act also sets out-of-pocket maximums for non-grandfathered plans. For 2016, the ACA maximum will be $6,850 for self-only coverage and $13,700 for family coverage (compared to $6,550 and $13,100 for HDHPs). In addition, recent HHS guidance provides that, beginning in 2016, the self-only ACA out-of-pocket maximum must be "embedded" within the family ACA out-of-pocket maximum, meaning that no individual may be subject to out-of-pocket expenses in excess of the self-only maximum. In the case of a plan intended to be an HDHP, this means that (1) the out-of-pocket maximum cannot exceed the lower maximum applicable to HDHPs, and (2) the out-of-pocket maximum for an individual covered under a family plan cannot exceed the ACA maximum for self-only coverage. 

Example. An HDHP for 2016 has a family deductible of $13,100, with no other cost sharing. This is permissible because it does not exceed either the ACA out-of-pocket maximum limit ($13,700) or the lower HDHP out-of-pocket maximum limit ($13,100). However, the plan must further provide that no member of the family will be required to contribute more than $6,850 toward the family deductible during 2016, so the individual's cost sharing is capped at the "embedded" ACA limit for self-only coverage. 

Maximum HSA Contribution. The maximum annual contribution to an HSA for 2016 will remain $3,350 for an individual with self-only HDHP coverage and will increase to $6,750 for an individual with family HDHP coverage. Catch-up contributions for individuals age 55 and older are not inflation-adjusted and remain at $1,000 per year.

Recall that these annual maximums are prorated on a monthly basis for an individual who is covered under an HDHP for less than the full year. Also, special rules apply when one or both spouses have HDHP coverage, with the general effect of limiting the household to a single family-level HSA contribution for the year.

Revenue Procedure 2015-30 is available here: www.irs.gov/pub/irs-drop/rp-15-30.pdf