Despite ranking third in the nation for rooftop solar potential, the "Sunshine State" is 13th in cumulative solar capacity installed (dreary New Jersey is 3rd). This is the result of a state without a renewable energy portfolio standard (RPS) that does not permit power purchase agreements (PPAs) (Florida is one of only five states that explicitly prohibits anyone other than the big utilities from selling power).

Depending on whom you ask, Florida's lack of solar infrastructure is either caused by the "monopoly" held by the State's big power companies, or the simple viewpoint that solar is a silly alternative when you compare cost to the comparatively cheap prices from more conventional generation sources.

Well, the debate is scheduled to be settled soon...

Environmentalists in Florida are pushing for a constitutional amendment initiative to place solar choice on the November 2016 ballot. The purpose of the ballot proposal is to expand solar choice by removing barriers that limit solar ownership models. If approved, the ballot measure would allow homes and businesses to install solar and sell excess energy they generate back into the grid.

Curiously enough, much of the focus on this particular ballot proposal has been on the unlikely alliances that are now supporting the measure. Tea Party conservatives and aggressive libertarians (who advocate for free-market principles through energy choice) find themselves aligned with fundamental environmentalists and progressive liberals (who advocate for cleaner energy solutions). Opponents of course oppose taxpayer subsidies and consumer mandates.

Regardless of one's viewpoint, an amendment permitting third-party sales in Florida will immediately result in a tremendous boom to the Sunshine State's solar industry. If that road is opened, expect a sea of solar developers to begin canvasing I-95 for opportunities from the Panhandle to the Keys.